The Micah Mandate: Moving us Forward (updated)

What a delightful surprise to have a number of pieces ready for this Monday’s update.  Especially noteworthy for me is one from an East Malaysian perspective from a pastor, and also two other perspectives on issues from young men in their thirties one single and one married with one boy.  I do think we need more views from women. We’ll work on that.

micah_mandate_wordle_tenaganita

Commentary
Weekly News Monitor: 7th July, 2008
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Commentary
Bumiputera Christians and the use of “Allah” by Rev Lidis Singkung
Read the article…

… I am interested to find a specific clause in our Federal Constitution spelling out that beginning 1963 Christians no longer can use “Allah” because it would confuse the Muslims and only Muslims can use the word. What has happened I suggest is rather an afterthought pronouncement so to speak, and if so, what other proactive approach could be taken to rectify it? For example, it is far effective to educate Malaysians regarding the use of Allah than legislate its use.

… We must also allay the fear among Muslims that we might use the word to confuse or win them over. It is a legitimate concern, especially in the context of Malaysia. I sincerely believe the Christian community will not resort to this scheme.

I chipped in a comment to Rev. Lidis’ article …

Beyond "Legislation"

Thank you Rev. Lidis Singkung for helping us see how you are working through the issues surrounding the use of "Allah" in our contexts.

I totally agree with you that "it is far effective to educate Malaysians regarding the use of Allah than legislate its use."

In a conversation with my Muslim friend, he asked about whether there are Christians who want to use the word "Allah" to confuse Muslims. So, I agree with you, that there is a legitimate concern on their part.

Parallel with the court proceedings on this matter, I feel as Christians we need to reexamine how we can relate to our Muslim family members and friends characterized not with a "us/them" kind of hostility but as fellow pilgrims seeking to fear (revere) and love God.

With that as a starting point, i.e. consciously seeking to see the best in the "other" we can then honestly and respectfully talk about our common concerns as well as fears and aspirations as fellow human beings in this country.

Many of us at different levels would need to clearly demonstrate "love" for our fellow Muslim neighbor by engaging in needed conversations without defensiveness but seeking to understand their concerns as well, which apart from the use of the word "Allah" would include issues for example like poverty, the raising, protection and education of our children, the well-being of our neighborhoods, working together for the betterment of our nation, and so on.

Commentary
I wish I could be with my brothers and sisters… by Alvin Yap
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Commentary
Responding to crises by Alwyn Lau
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Today we have different crises before us but – like all events big, bad and widespread – the Body of Christ can respond in a way which not only provides a model for the world but actually saves it, an act which in turn leads to the kingdom of God being realised more.

How can Malaysian Christians in this latest century behave like the Roman Christians in the early centuries? How can we refrain from ‘escaping’ the fuel-hike crisis and instead show the world how true Christ-like humanity behaves in the thick of one? E.g. how about offering to provide free car-pooling to our friends, at our own personal cost? Or if you’re a boss, how about giving a fuel subsidy to your employees?

Commentary
Trial of Irene Fernandez, Director of Tenaganita postponed to August 5, 2008 Press release by Tenaganita
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Reflection
4 FROM SAMURAI TO PLAYFUL BOY By Koichi Ohtawa
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Reflection
MICAH MANDATE’S WEEKLY BIBLICAL CHALLENGE By Peter Young
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About Sivin Kit

man of one wife, father of four kids
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