Lent 17.1: ON KNOWLEDGE

Matthew 21.33-43, 45-46

The acquisition of knowledge can lead to two possible consequences. On the one hand, it can retard a person’s recognition of truth by leading the person to render himself/herself the ultimate arbiter of truth. Such a person will inevitably fail to recognise the work of Christ in his/her life. In failing to recognise the power of truth, he/she also fails to recognise the One who is, Himself, “the way and the truth and the life” (Jn 14.6). This is a typical case of being puffed up by knowledge. On the other hand, knowledge can lead one to a greater wisdom pertaining to the things of God. It can sensitise one towards divine sensibilities and lead one to recognise the things of God.

We live in a world that exploits knowledge by using it, in turn, to judge the validity of its Source, who is God Himself. The enterprise of using knowledge to kill the validity of God is not new (Mt 21.45-46). The ultimate question in one’s pursuit of knowledge is this: Does our acquisition of knowledge lead us to know God, and to love Him better and deeper?

Reflection: Take a moment to ponder on your area of study / work. In what way might this field of study / work lead you to a better understanding of and a greater devotion towards God?

(Meditation above from Sherman)

My response:

I’ve been focusing a lot on the study of theology .. specifically on Church. The overall study of theology has led me to be humbler in my human “graspings” of God as well as richer in my fresh “perceptions” of Him. I’ve also found myself having a more “realistic” picture of humanity and more variety in connecting my spirituality with new understandings in theology. My study on church has at least caused me not to give up on her. In some cases, I’ve got injected with some hope.

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